Couples Counseling & Family Therapy in Denver

Effective Couples Therapy & Marriage Counseling

If you’re part of a couple in distress, you may feel that there’s no way out of your troubled relationship. Myths about the low success rates of couples therapy and counseling only make your situation seem worse than it is. The problem is real enough- couples often wait until very late in the game to seek intervention and by then, one or both may have decided to call it quits. It’s also true that being an effective couples therapist requires different skills than the skills demanded by being an effective individual therapist. Nevertheless, when properly conducted, couples therapy can have demonstrably positive effects.

Being a couples therapist does require special skills but that is what the training is about. Individuals who go into marriage and family counseling or therapy take years of rigorous coursework and supervision, go through an arduous credentialing and licensing process, and continue to receive education throughout their careers to learn about the field’s newest developments.  There inevitably is self-selection involved in who decides to become a family therapist and, even more so, who stays in the profession. The chances are excellent that the couples therapist you see is someone who is providing this treatment because he or she is committed to helping couples enact positive changes in their lives.

Let’s turn now to those five basic principles of effective couples therapy, which, according to Benson and colleagues:

1. Changes the views of the relationship.  Throughout the therapeutic process, the therapist attempts to help both partners see the relationship in a more objective manner.  They learn to stop the “blame game” and instead look at what happens to them as a process involving each partner. They also can benefit from seeing that their relationship takes place in a certain context.  For example, couples who struggle financially will be under different kinds of situational stresses than those who are not.   Therapists begin this process by collecting “data” on the interaction between the partners by watching how they interact. Therapists then formulate “hypotheses” about what causal factors may be in play to lead to the way the couples interact. How they share this information with the couple varies by the therapist’s particular theoretical orientation. There’s empirical support for a variety of approaches from behavioral to insight-oriented.  Different therapists will use different strategies, but as long as they focus on altering the way the relationship is understood, the couple can start to see each other, and their interactions, in more adaptive ways.

2. Modifies dysfunctional behavior. Effective couples therapists attempt to change the way that the partners actually behave with each other. This means that in addition to helping them improve their interactions, therapists also need to ensure that their clients are not engaging in actions that can cause physical, psychological, or economic harm.   In order to do this, therapists must conduct a careful assessment to determine whether their clients are, in fact, at risk.  If necessary, the therapist may recommend, for example, that one partner be referred to a domestic violence shelter, to specialized drug abuse treatment, or to anger management.  It is also possible that if the risk is not sufficiently severe, the couple can benefit from “time-out” procedures to stop the escalation of conflict.

3. Decreases emotional avoidance.  Couples who avoid expressing their private feelings put themselves at greater risk of becoming emotionally distant and hence grow apart. Effective couples therapists help their clients bring out the emotions and thoughts that they fear expressing to the other person. Attachment-based couples therapy allows the partners to feel less afraid of expressing their needs for closeness.  According to this view, some partners who failed to develop “secure” emotional attachments in childhood have unmet needs that they carry over into their adult relationships. They fear showing their partners how much they need them because they are afraid that their partners will reject them. Behaviorally based therapists, assume that adults may fear expressing their true feelings because, in the past, they did not receive “reinforcement.”  Either way, both theoretical approaches advocate helping their clients express their true feelings in a way that will eventually draw them closer together

4. Improves communication.  Being able to communicate is one of the “three C’s” of intimacy. All effective couples therapies focus on helping the partners to communicate more effectively. Building on principles #2 and #3, this communication should not be abusive, nor should partners ridicule each other when they do express their true feelings. Couples may, therefore, require “coaching” to learn how to speak to each other in more supportive and understanding ways.  The therapist may also provide the couple with didactic instruction to give them the basis for knowing what types of communication are effective and what types will only cause more conflict.  They can learn how to listen more actively and empathically, for example. However, exactly how to accomplish this step requires that therapists turn back to the assessments they performed early on in treatment.  Couples with a long history of mutual criticism may require a different approach than those who try to avoid conflict at all costs.

5. Promotes strengths. Effective couples therapists point out the strengths in the relationship and build resilienceparticularly as therapy nears a close.  Because so much of couples therapy involves focusing on problem areas, it’s easy to lose sight of the other areas in which couples function effectively. The point of promoting strength is to help the couple derive more enjoyment out of their relationship. The behaviorally-oriented therapist may “prescribe” that one partner do something that pleases the other.  Therapists from other orientations that focus more on emotions instead might help the couple develop a more positive “story” or narrative about their relationship.  In either case, the therapist should avoid trying to put his or her own spin on what constitutes a strength and let this be defined by the couple.

We can see, then, that people in troubled relationships need not give up in despair if their situation seems bleak. By the same token, people afraid of entering long-term relationships can be encouraged by learning that trouble relationships can be fixed.

 

Information obtained by: Psychology Today

Benson, L. A., McGinn, M. M., & Christensen, A. (2012). Common principles of couple therapy. Behavior Therapy43(1), 25-35. doi:10.1016/j.beth.2010.12.009

Family Therapy: What Is It?

Family therapy brings parents, siblings and extended family members such as aunts, uncles and grandparents into the treatment process. The family system has its own structure and patterns of communication, which may be defined by parenting style, personalities and other influences.

Every individual is, in part, a product of the environment they grew up in. Family plays an important role in our emotional, physical and spiritual development since each individual in the family system impacts and is impacted by the others. For example, one person’s illness can change the lives and interactions of all the other family members.

Family therapy may be helpful to:

  • Resolve a specific issue
  • Prepare the family for a major life change such as a divorce or remarriage
  • Address the role that family plays in an individual’s life

Depending on the unique needs and goals of the family, different combinations of family members may participate in each therapy session. The family therapist may give family members assignments to begin addressing some of the challenges identified during therapy.

What Are The Benefits of  Seeking Family Therapy in Denver?

Evaluating issues in family therapy can help an individual:

  • Understand how their family functions
  • Identify strengths and weaknesses within the family system
  • Set goals and develop strategies to resolve challenges
  • Improve communication skills
  • Make the entire family stronger

Family therapy is often used in concert with other types of mental health treatment, particularly if one or more family members would benefit from specialized treatment for addictions, eating disorders or other illnesses. Some mental health programs offer a family therapy component while a loved one is in treatment and also encourage each family member to pursue individual therapy.

What Conditions or Disorders Does Family Therapy Treat?

Anyone seeking healthier, closer family relationships can benefit from family therapy. Family therapy is used to treat a wide range of conditions, including:

  • Marital problems
  • Parent-child conflict
  • Problems between siblings
  • The effects of illness on the family

Studies show that family therapy is particularly important for adults and adolescents struggling with substance abuse, eating disorders, and other emotional and behavioral issues. When the whole family grows, each individual member is better off.

Information obtained by: CRC Health

Family Therapy, Marriage Counseling, and Couples Therapy in Denver, CO

Original Path Counseling provides therapy for family and relationship probelms in the Denver Metro Area; including Centennial, Castle Rock, Parker, Highlands Ranch, Lone Tree, Greenwood Village, Aurora, Englewood, and the surrounding Denver communities.